Renderings of the First Parish of Sudbury

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Winter settles in at the First Parish of Sudbury, MA. The sign reads: First West Precinct Meeting House on the Rocky Plain built 1723. This is the Second Meeting House. Built in 1797. Unitarian since 1839.

For this set I used a Sigma 10-22mm ultra wide angle lens on a Canon D20 Digital SLR, with bracketing at 2/3 stop and manual exposure at f8. Selected photos were post processed in Adobe Photoshop using a technique that includes applying a medium degree of Poster Edges which creates a watercolor with pen & ink look as though they were hand drawn.

This photo gallery also available on Flickr.

Learning about printing and framing of large prints

Shutterfly print of Concord CenterShutterfly print of Tunkhannock Viaduct This fall I've starting making a more serious effort to learn and practice photography as an art. I've purchased a Canon EOS 20D digital SLR with a variety of lenses, I've taken a class on using Digital SLRs at the Decordova Museum, I've taken a local printing workshop, and I recently purchased a 21 hour Total Training Photoshop CS2 DVD from Adobe.

While I think my technical mastery of the digital SLR is good to very good, and my composition is very good, I still lack printing skills and equipment. One day I'd like to have a home studio with large format printer from Epson or HP where I can print 13x19 inch prints on high quality art paper or canvas like that from Moab. From there I'd like to try to sell my work for a small profit to recoup costs and then a little more for my effort. I'm thinking over methods of selling that include dutch auctions on eBay, negotiating with local restaurants to hang and sell framed images, participating in arts and crafts festivals, as well as obtaining a permit from my town to sell them on the street in the town center. I'm not sure what's possible yet, but check back here next year and hopefully I'll have it figured out.

Until I can develop my own photo studio at home, I had a couple of my favorite recent images printed in 20x30 inch format by Shutterfly. The original images were high quality and suitable for printing in 11x17 inch, so rather than having Shutterfly englarge them, I used a technique in Photoshop to upsample them by first adjusting the resolution from 72 ppi to 300 ppi, then incrementally increasing the print size until I reached 20x30. The result is an image file about 5 times larger but with a resolution and size suitable for this large format printing without noticible degredation in quality.

I was moderately satisfied with the prints as they came back from Shutterfly. While the site says they will be printed on a flat, low-reflection matte paper, in reality it looks more like semi-gloss because it much more shiny than I hoped for. The image quality was quite good, and I'm having these two photos professionally matted and framed by Corner's Framing. The staff at Corner's Framing was very patient and helped me understand the whole process and the cost breakdown so that I could make choices to lower the cost. Framing is quite expensive, and I learned that the frame itself is by far the largest factor in the price. Our initial selection for a frame cost $444 just for the wooden moulding, but they helped me find a a nice looking, suitable frame for about $175 instead. It will be 2 weeks before they are ready.

Should I start selling my prints, I think I'll try to have them professionally matted for about $40 including dry mounting and backing, but I'll either sell them matted only or in inexpensive metal frames. You can view a smaller version of the Concord Center print and the Nicholson Bridge print.

Resources:
Framing Large Prints
From your hard drive to your wall