Adobe MAX 2006 on Flickr

My week in pictures... on Flickr.

Adobe MAX Developer Conference, October 23-26, 2006, at The Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada.

MAX 2006, the annual Adobe user conference, offers the Adobe community an unprecedented opportunity to learn about Adobe software, interact with industry experts, connect with other Adobe software users, and have lots of fun.

Choose from over 100 unique sessions organized into eight tracks in topics such as web design, rich Internet applications, and mobile and devices.

Connect with other members of the Adobe community at a variety of networking opportunities, including the community lounge, sponsor lunches, and "Birds-of-a-Feather" sessions.
www.flickr.com


See also the Adobe MAX 2006 Flickr Pool and all photos tagged with Adobe MAX 2006

Saving costs in Linux environments while still using a stable server platform for ColdFusion

I began this as a comment to Matt Woodward's blog entry on ColdFusion start scripts on Ubuntu Linux. I just wanted to add some links, but it became lengthy and is better suited as a blog post of my own.

I'm not a Ubuntu user, but strictly Red Hat, Fedora, or Red Hat clones. I just wanted to post some related links for Red Hat users.



On the topic of running ColdFusion on "unsupported" Linux distributions, I recommend using Red Hat clones such as CentOS, rather than bleeding edge distributions if you absolutely cannot run a distro supported for use with ColdFusion by Adobe.

Fedora Core Linux, for example, is a bleeding edge distribution and is not appropriate as a production server even though it is sponsored by Red Hat. For a server you want stability with a well tested suite of packages rather than a distro that has all the bells and whistles but hasn't been put through its paces or tightened up as much the stable commercial release.

CentOS is built from the same source as Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Effectively CentOS is RHEL, except that CentOS is free and supported by the community. This is possible because under the GPL, Red Hat must make its source available, and CentOS takes advantage of that. I'm not bashing Ubuntu or other distros here, but CentOS is a recommended stable OS that is appropriate as a production server, and I've had some Red Hat instructors tell me so off the record.

Since ColdFusion is QA'd on RHEL you can feel confident that a Red Hat clone will be as reliable as RHEL itself, even if that OS doesn't show up on the ColdFusion System Requirements. Still, however, should anyone using a clone need to seek ColdFusion Support from Adobe, you may be asked to first reproduce the problem on RHEL itself.

A good use of Red Hat clones for a small shop would be to use the clones for development and staging/QA of ColdFusion web applications, then host the final application on a paid RHEL server. This way you can save costs on non-production environments.



The same argument applies to clones of SuSe Linux Enterprise Server as well, although since I'm not a SuSe fan I can't name any of their clones.

Adding Authorship, Description, and Copyright to images with Adobe XMP in Bridge

I've been asked many times how I embed information in a photograph (i.e. a jpg file) such as my name, my contact info, a description, a location, and even a copyright (such as a Creative Commons License). This metadata becomes part of the image file, and remains part of the image even if renamed or resized by me or anyone else. If you ever find that someone has used your photo without permission and even perhaps claimed ownership of the photo while denying the theft, then IPTC metadata is a good way to prove ownership. The metadata can be deliberately changed or removed by editing the IPTC metadata, but I think most unauthorized usage of images is done without tampering with the metadata since its hidden in the image file, and you can't see that its there by looking at the picture.

To embed this type of metadata in an image I use Adobe Bridge, a product that ships with Adobe Photoshop CS2. Here's a screenshot that show's the IPTC panel in Bridge. You can select one or more images and edit the IPTC metadata simultaneously.

From the web page about Adobe eXtensible Metadata Platform (XMP):

Adobe's Extensible Metadata Platform (XMP) is a labeling technology that allows you to embed data about a file, known as metadata, into the file itself. With XMP, desktop applications and back-end publishing systems gain a common method for capturing, sharing, and leveraging this valuable metadata opening the door for more efficient job processing, workflow automation, and rights management, among many other possibilities. With XMP, Adobe has taken the heavy lifting out of metadata integration, offering content creators an easy way to embed meaningful information about their projects and providing industry partners with standards-based building blocks to develop optimized workflow solutions.




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Boston Skyline at Night

Some wide angle, long exposures of the Boston skyline at night, as well as some of Memorial Drive and the Longfellow Bridge near Kendall Square in Cambridge.

www.flickr.com

ColdFusion MX 7 support for 64-bit platforms

A clarification has been made to this ColdFusion technote. The current support policy can be summarized as

  • ColdFusion MX 7 is supported with a supported 32-bit Java VM running on supported operating systems on 64-bit hardware.
Although, you should read the technote for all the details. Previously, the technote generalized incorrectly that ColdFusion would not run at all on 64-bit platforms.

See also:

Performance Considerations for Running ColdFusion MX 7 on 64-bit JVM

Tales told by Simon Brooks

Simon Brooks, a former coworker of mine at Allaire and Macromedia, has become an innovative storyteller and launched the business DiamondScree. Simon's a very nice guy with a great imagination. Check out his website:

Simon began spinning yarns and telling tales in 1991 when he would perform for school groups and families at Youth Hostels in the United Kingdom before moving to the States. In 2003 Simon became a Children's Librarian and freelance storyteller. He has performed for libraries, schools, and private functions and festivals telling to young children and adults. Combining his passion for children's literature and folklore, Simon creates a fun program for all ages. His repertoire comes mainly from European folk and faery tales, but Simon also includes stories from South America, Africa, China and Japan amongst other countries and cultures. All these stories are given life and animation by unique voices, as they are acted out in front of a captivated audience.

Simon Brooks performs tales with energy and wit. Telling folktales, myths and legends from all over the world, he brings characters like Ananzi the Spider, the trickster Raven, Wayland Smith, Merlin and Dionysus vividly to life. From the world of stories Simon captivates his audience with unique voices to animate characters and with expressive body language, he truly brings the stories to life.


Simon made his first CD over the winter of 2005/6 which was released to great applause in June 2006. "Second-hand Tales" To find a copy of his CD, please visit cdbaby.com Here you will be able to hear his storytelling at his finest.

Visit DiamondScree today!

Adobe Contribute 4 Adds Support for Blogger, Typepad, and Wordpress

Adobe Adds Sophisticated Blogging Capabilities to Contribute 4

Adobe Contribute 4 makes it easy for web designers and developers, as well as web administrators to help their users get started with blogs using the same familiar environment they use to update Web site content. Contribute also supports the most popular blog servers -- Blogger, Typepad, and Wordpress (but not ColdFusion-based BlogCFC unfortunately)-- and gives the option of connecting to in-house blog servers, straight out of the box. Rich media support has been enhanced in Adobe Contribute 4 enabling users to drag and drop images, movies, and now Adobe FlashÆ video files into their Web pages or blog entries. In addition, users can publish content from a browser to their Web site and blog. Contribute maintains the original formatting and automatically posts the source for the content as well as a link.


With AdobeÆ ContributeÆ 4, anyone can quickly, easily, and safely update existing websites and blogs.
With Adobe Contribute 4, anyone can update website content or create blog entries using a single application. True WYSIWYG authoring capabilities let users edit any website or blog in three simple steps, dramatically reducing editing time. Simply browse to the website or blog entry, click Edit to make changes, then click Publish when ready to post the new content. Alternatively, authors can publish directly from within Microsoft Office applications including Word, Excel and Outlook with the click of a button. Just open the document that contains the content to publish, click Publish, and select the target website or blog.


Read more about Adobe Contribute 4, available from $179 US.