Traditional Maryland Crab Soup

Traditional Maryland Crab Soup While waiting at BWI airport this past Friday evening, I stumbled into an old favorite, Bill Bateman's Restaurant, to find this delicious bowl of soup on the menu. I could not resist. Just look at the chunks of backfin in there!

I grew up in Maryland and lived there until I moved to Boston twelve years ago. There's so much about that great state that I miss, and I think Maryland crabs in any form top the list. Crab soup, crab cakes, fried softcrabs, ... I can't get enough! I even worked on a real commercial crab boat in the lower Chesapeake Bay.

Bill Batemans was an old hangout on Cub Hill Rd in Carney, but I've heard he's had a lot of success and expanded with a chain of restaurants. His crab soup was so good, I topped it off with a crabcake sandwich, but it looked so good I forgot to take a picture :) Darn it, I'll just have to return for another .

The traditional spice for Maryland crabs is Old Bay, from McCormick, so of all the recipes I've found for crab soup, I'll recommend theirs: OLD BAY Maryland Crab Soup. Although, they suggest that other types of crabs might be healthier, I assure you they do not taste nearly as good as the Maryland Blue Crab.

The Long Road to Red Hat Certified Engineer

Linux Pocket GuideIn 1999 I purchased my first PC from a local trade show where small vendors built the PC according to a printed spec sheet where the consumer would check off components that would comprise the final product. It reminded me a lot of ordering sushi.

My friend Ken Sugino, a computational neuroscientist student at Brandeis University, encouraged me to install Linux on it. I had never heard very much of Linux back then, but since Ken and I ordered identical PCs, both lacking an operating system, he recommended we install Red Hat Linux 5. Thus began my fondness for the fine grained control over an operating system and its applications that I never before witnessed on any Windows 98 or Mac OS 7, 8, or 9 system.

I recall that the state of Linux was still pretty raw back then and out of the box support for new hardware was often lacking. For example, when Ken finished examining the motherboard spec sheet and tuned all the jumper switches to provide a custom hardware setup, we moved on to searching the web for a solution to overcome a problem where X would not start -- X is the windowing or graphical interface for Linux -- and soon we found an esoteric hack for the video card chipset settings that did the trick. Much of my early experience with Linux was like that. It was the Wild West of operating systems.

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