Could not find ColdFusion component or interface Query

My best blogging years were when I worked in ColdFusion Technical Support, from Allaire and right on thru Macromedia then Adobe. Constantly fielding customer questions provided an endless source of fodder to investigate and blog about when a solution or workaround was found. It feels a little like old times again now that my QA team is expanding and I've been helping others come up to speed with our ColdFusion driven Automated Test Suite. Although my colleagues are experienced web professionals, I'm happy there is room for mentoring in ColdFusion, and that provides me with more fodder to share here.

After helping someone install ColdFusion 9.0 and apply the 9.01 updater, they reported the updater failed to complete. We cleaned things up a bit, confirmed installers, and tried again. Success. Shortly after, we continued setting up the test suite environment they reported a very unusual error that I'd never seen before, Could not find the ColdFusion component or interface Query. With a bit of Googling, I found that there were only 2 hits, and one was in a comment on Ben Nadel's blog where he provided the winning hint. The other hit was a tweet about it when someone else encountered this issue.

Per Ben's hint, I had my colleague check the CF Admin's Custom Tag mappings, and the source of the problem was immediately evident. The core mapping for "C:ColdFusion9CustomTags" was missing. Prior to then, I thought this mapping was immutable by the end user of the CF Admin. Perhaps it was due to the initial failed 9.01 updater, I'm not really sure how that mapping got wiped out, but as soon as we restored it, everything worked.

The mapping is needed because some parts of the Core CFML language are implemented as custom tags stored in that core location. This includes the query.cfc tag, which implements the script-based version of CFQuery. Without that mapping, there will be several language areas that won't work.

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How To Filter by File Type in Lightroom 2

One of my favorite blogs, Lightroom Killer Tips, posted an entry today regarding how to filter according to file type in Lightroom 2. The entry is a revision or repost of the same thing for Lightroom 1 posted on that blog 9 months ago.

However, the tiny screenshot of the Metadata Browser used on the updated blog entry was taken from their earlier post about the older version of Lightroom. I'm sure it was an oversight during light holiday blogging.

Since the whole metadata search feature was improved and restructured after Lightroom 1, I wanted to post an updated screenshot of my own showing how to filter by file type in the new version, Lightroom 2. This is useful if you searching just for JPG, TIF, or PSD files specifically, for example.

Click on the photo below to see it on Flickr, or for those not having an account here's a direct link.

Filter by File Type in Lightroom 2

Adobe Lightroom Adventure 2008 in Tasmania

Wow, did I miss the boat on this one! (or the plane as the case may be)

The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Team is happily clicking away as I type this in the luxurious landscape of Tasmania this week and next, corresponding with the release of Lightroom 2.0 Beta.

This is the sequel to the very successful Adobe Lightroom Adventure 2006 in Iceland which produced copious gigabytes of beautiful images to herald the launch of the first version of Lightroom.

You can follow their daily blogging from Tasmania on the O'Reilly website here. Among the crew is a friend and colleague Angela Drury, frequent contributor to Photoshop User magazine, award winning photographer, and manager of Dreamweaver Support at Adobe.

Photography Web Utilities and My Recent Work

The holiday season has come and gone with little blogging on my part, but there's a few photography utilities for the web that I've wanted to mention. Its been a busy season with a couple weeks in Barcelona and a regular evening schedule at the Center for Digital Imaging Arts at BU. It won't get less busy for me, so now's the time to share...

Lightroom SDK: Flickr Export Plugin
Lightroom Flickr Export PluginThe SDK (Software Developer's Kit) for Lightroom provides software developers a way to build custom plugins for Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. An example plugin to Export photos directly from Lightroom to Flickr comes with the SDK, so download the Lightroom SDK to get it. Even if you don't care about the SDK and aren't a software geek, download it anyway just to get the plugin to make your Flickr workflow even easier.




SlideShowPro for Lightroom
Speaking of Lightroom (yes, it is my favorite piece of image software right now!), for just $25 you can buy an excellent plugin for Lightroom to export stylish and sophisticated Flash-based Web Galleries for your website. Its very easy to use and provides an intuitive panel of gallery styling options. Previously, to use SlideShowPro you had to understand the Flash Authoring tool in order to get started, but with Lightroom its now incredibly simple to use. Here's where you can check out a Web Gallery example of the SlideShowPro plugin for Lightroom




FlickrEdit: Backup Your Flickr Library
And speaking of Flickr, I've recently read some recommendations for FlickrEdit, free utility that permits you to backup all your images on Flickr to your local desktop, among other things. I haven't used it yet, but it seems like a very useful safety net to have around.




Photographic Storytelling with Soundslides Plus
Moving back to the topic of Web Image Galleries, I've just stumbled across a remarkable Flash-based tool from Soundslides geared towards photojournalists that enables you to easily synchronize digital audio recordings with a collection of photographs. Check out this newspaper article Through the Artists' Eyes to view two wonderful examples.




HDR and Tone Mapping with PhotoMatix
Although Photoshop CS2 and CS3 have a built-in automation tool for generating HDR images from multiple exposures, I've been giving Photomatix a test drive because it has been touted to have better fine-tuned control over the Tone Mapping process. In fact, I find that when using Photomatix I have had more success with HDR, just take a look below for some recent examples. There's lots of detailed knobs and sliders during the Tone Mapping process in Photomatix, and to save time later when I produce a satisfying result Photomatix allows me to save my settings. Later, when working on a new image I can try on some of my previous settings to quickly see if any produce a pleasing effect.





The Tower of Our Sea La Proxima Dirty Business


There we have it... I hope you find some of these useful as I have. Now, since I've got your attention, here's some of my recent work both from the studio at CDIA and from my recent trips to Barcelona and San Francisco. Enjoy!

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Looking for a local vineyard and winery in the Northeast US? Try Nimble Hill.

Nimble Hill Vineyard and WineryThis past weekend the website and blog for Nimble Hill Vineyard and Winery went live -- a site I constructed with a template from OSWD for the skin, SlideShow Pro for the photo albums, Google Maps API, and BlogCFC for the Journal.

Currently there is one photo album, taken during the first winemaking ever at Nimble Hill, in October 2006. All photos were taken myself. Soon, Nimble Hill will hold the grand opening of the Tasting Room, and I hope to be present to photograph the event for another album.

Nimble Hill is my cousin Gary's winery in the northeast of Pennsylvania. He operates it as a family winery with help from his wife and children. If you're in the vicinity of New York City, New Jersey, or Connecticut then consider taking a country drive for a couple hours to this beautiful part of the state.

This the first time Gary has ever used a blog, and he's just gotten started with his first post. Please stop by to welcome Gary to the blogosphere by posting a comment so that he can see what blogging is all about.

Gary and Ellie opened the winery to have a business where they can work with and alongside their family, whether it be tending vines, crushing grapes, making wine, or minding the tasting room in Tunkhannock.

Adobe Contribute 4 Adds Support for Blogger, Typepad, and Wordpress

Adobe Adds Sophisticated Blogging Capabilities to Contribute 4

Adobe Contribute 4 makes it easy for web designers and developers, as well as web administrators to help their users get started with blogs using the same familiar environment they use to update Web site content. Contribute also supports the most popular blog servers -- Blogger, Typepad, and Wordpress (but not ColdFusion-based BlogCFC unfortunately)-- and gives the option of connecting to in-house blog servers, straight out of the box. Rich media support has been enhanced in Adobe Contribute 4 enabling users to drag and drop images, movies, and now Adobe FlashÆ video files into their Web pages or blog entries. In addition, users can publish content from a browser to their Web site and blog. Contribute maintains the original formatting and automatically posts the source for the content as well as a link.


With AdobeÆ ContributeÆ 4, anyone can quickly, easily, and safely update existing websites and blogs.
With Adobe Contribute 4, anyone can update website content or create blog entries using a single application. True WYSIWYG authoring capabilities let users edit any website or blog in three simple steps, dramatically reducing editing time. Simply browse to the website or blog entry, click Edit to make changes, then click Publish when ready to post the new content. Alternatively, authors can publish directly from within Microsoft Office applications including Word, Excel and Outlook with the click of a button. Just open the document that contains the content to publish, click Publish, and select the target website or blog.


Read more about Adobe Contribute 4, available from $179 US.

Your rights to take photographs in public places

Wired Magazine published a short article regarding privacy concerns and your rights as an amateur photographer, titled Stalker or Shutterbug. Its a helpful article that explains some tricky situations, but generally speaking within the United States you are pretty much free to take a picture of any place that is viewable from a public space, whether the subject be a person, a home, a building, an event, or any other public scene.

Earlier this year I was angrily confronted for having posted a picture of a beach house in North Carolina. Although the location was anonymous in the sense that there was no address, signs, or other identifier in the image, some clever people must have figured out the exact location based on the context of the other images in the photo gallery.

Moreover, those clever individuals must have gone one step further and researched the home's address and owner contact information since the complaint I received was from the home owner demanding (IN CAPS) that I immediately take down the photo within 48 hours or he'll sick his lawyers on me. You see, random people were apparently calling him to rent the beach house after seeing my anonymous photo. It was then that I decided to investigate what my rights were and all the articles I found tracked back to Bert Krages, an Attorney At Law specializing in photography cases.

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New ColdFusion Devnet Article on J2EE EAR Application Packaging

Last week a new article on ColdFusion MX 7 Packaging and Deployment was published on the Adobe ColdFusion Developer Center.

Designing ColdFusion Applications for Deployment as EAR Files
By Jochem van Dieten and Mark van Hedel


In this article the authors begin by describing the anatomy of a J2EE EAR file and the advantages of using EARs to distribute ColdFusion applications. It continues with some of the challenges faced when packaging ColdFusion EAR files, and expands into building and customizing them with Apache Ant.

I think the authors make an exceptionally good point towards the end where they recommend that the packaged application ship with a wizard (to be written with the app that is packaged) that runs first when deployment is complete where the wizard would be a custom interface to ColdFusion settings using the Admin API. This would solve the problems discussed in Episode 7 of the ColdFusion Podcast where some concerns are raised regarding the inclusion of a CF serial number and Admin password, or adding datasources and mapping definitions after deployment. The authors wrap up with a clever suggestions for Application Start-Time configurations.

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IT Conversations Podcast: Interview with Jeremy Allaire on Video Distribution

As a fan of the high quality podcasts from IT Conversations, I was browsing for other podcasts not in the channels to which I already subscribe. I discovered a December 2005 podcast interview with Jeremy Allaire, the founder of Brightcove, although perhaps better known as the founder of Allaire Corporation and the flagship application server Cold Fusion (Yes, with a space in the name until the late 90's).

While checking my facts while preparing to blog this, I discovered two related podcasts from IT Conversations including another panel interview in 2005 on reinventing media, as well as a 2004 interview with David Orfao of General Catalyst, formerly CEO of Allaire Corportation. (Anecdotally, my introduction to David occurred when he surprised me at my desk one morning. By coincidence, I had dropped my badge at a convenience store near my residence, and David just happened to find it shortly after).

Now, about those podcasts:

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Science Podcasts from Science Friday, but wait, there's more!

This must be the year for science podcasts. Scientific American began publishing weekly podcasts of current news in science, and I've just learned that one of my old favorite radio programs is also available by podcast, Science Friday. The Science Friday podcasts are derived from the weekly science news hour and published as a single podcast of each topic discussed in that hour. I used to listen to Science Friday each week while working the lab, and I hope they consider publishing an archive of the most interesting interviews from way back. One of my favorites was an interview with Carl Sagan from 1996.

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