Discovering the Adobe Bloggers

My view of the web technology world has been almost exclusively through the lens of two blog aggregators, MXNA and Full As A Goog. To my surprise, several new faces have turned up on MXNA today... native bloggers from Adobe itself. I didn't even know Adobe did blogging, so I'm pretty happy to know about this now.

The MXNA category Macromedia has been renamed to Adobe (formerly Macromedia), and now includes notable Adobe gurus such as:



This blog, TalkingTree.com, now shows up on the MXNA Adobe category. I choose to run my own domain and site independently, and I've never experienced any pressure to move my blog to the macromedia.com domain, especially since I blog a lot of personal material here as well, although my posts are largely about ColdFusion.

So check out blogs.adobe.com!!,... now if we can only convince the Adobe bloggers to start using the Jedi-grade BlogCFC.

Hello Adobe!

Since the announcement Thursday evening, the blogosphere has been saturated with speculations, musings, tributes, and congratulations about the Adobe merger with Macromedia. As a former Macromedia (and Allaire) employee, I'm personally excited that today is Day One for me at Adobe, and I can finally say so!

Although, it turns out that in the office Day One is not much different than any other day for me from a practical point of view. Its business as usual here in Newton. My same customers calling for support, the same ColdFusion community members IM-ing me, and the voices of my same colleagues echoing in the hallway.

So what am I excited about? Well, I get to work for the 13th best company in the US, according to Fortune Magazine, where if you consider only software companies, Adobe comes out as #1. For another, for 7 years I've been a big fan of Adobe Photoshop. I know it better than Jasc PaintShop Pro or The Gimp, or even Fireworks. Now I can approach Photoshop as a professional rather than just a hobbyist, and I look forward to more opportunities to learn the many features in Photoshop CS and CS2. I also get to watch ColdFusion evolve closer integration with Adobe products including not just PDF generation but their server technology as well. When Macromedia acquired Allaire who would have imagined Flex or Flash Forms or Flash Remoting, so imagine what the future holds for ColdFusion under the auspice of Adobe. Yet ColdFusion is still guided by and supported by many of the same passionate folks that have been doing so since the days of Allaire.

Like Jared said,... Yes, I'm psyched. Here's to another 10 years, folks!

Adobe Merges with Macromedia



Got Work? Solve ColdFusion Problems for Fun and Money

For those seeking employment in the Eastern Massachusetts area, there is a job opening for an Escalation Coldfusion Product Support Engineer, described as:

We are looking for a member of the ColdFusion Technical Support team to function as a Tier 3 (escalation) engineer. This is a senior-level technical position and the support delivered in this role is in English only. The product set being supported is associated with internet web applications. Client Server offerings include ColdFusion and JRun. ColdFusion is a HTML Tag based, proprietary server that works with databases and delivers dynamic contact to browser based users. JRun is a J2EE application server that runs applications based on industry standard JSP pages and/or Servlets. Other related technical skills include: Web Services, Java Literacy, dbms and SQL knowledge, LDAP, and general web application development and deployment.


The job posting is on Dice.com through a third party recruiter, although I'm not sure why its not listed on the Macromedia.com website. I was once in this escalation role for a year before I moved to "Gold" Support, and its definitely challenging. Are you up to it?

Please defer salary inquiries for the recruiter.

Jeremy Allaire's new company Brightcove lands major deal with AOL

All over the local business news, Cambridge Massachusetts company Brightcove, whose founder Jeremy Allaire is best known as the inventor of the ColdFusion application server, landed a $16M investment from AOL and Hearst Corporation. Brightcove plans to begin streaming television programs and video over the Internet next year.

How ColdFusion Receives and Processes Requests.

Here's another post I made to the internal forum for my class on Database Design where I describe how requests are handled by ColdFusion and how the webserver connector works in general. Reposting here in case anyone finds it useful.

--

A question was asked in yesterday's class regarding the difference between making requests to the Apache port versus the ColdFusion port.

Effectively, the answer is that there is no difference for the purpose of this class.

ColdFusion MX has a built-in webserver that can be used in lieu of an external, production-quality webserver like Apache, Iplanet, or IIS. The default for this built-in webserver is port 8500, 8501, or 8300 depending on the type of installation and CF version, and that port is configurable.

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Configuring the Oracle 10g Database Driver for ColdFusion MX

Oracle has recently released Oracle 10g Express Edition (XE), a free edition of their database server. While Macromedia supports connections to Oracle 10g from ColdFusion MX 7.01 using the built-in JDBC drivers that ship with ColdFusion, this version of Oracle is not officially supported with earlier versions including ColdFusion MX 7 or ColdFusion MX 6.x.

If you would like to connect an earlier version of ColdFusion MX to Oracle 10g, or would like to try an alternate driver if you're already using CFMX 7.01, then here is how to configure the 10g JDBC driver provided by Oracle for use with ColdFusion. This driver is often refered to as the Oracle Thin Client. Sometimes driver behavior varies between two vendors, so its often very helpful to try alternate driver versions.

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Geocities Guestbook - Recovered

Before this blog on TalkingTree.com, and before TalkingTree.com at all, I began a homepage with Geocities back in 1994, my first experience with homepage wizards or any kind of content management. Soon after getting hooked on HTML, I began building a laberynth of photo galleries and personal information, and after a couple of years I had managed to hack together some form of a Guestbook form on my own. Well, I know that Guestbooks are so 90's, but nevertheless I've rescued my Geocities Guestbook off Archive.org and am republishing it here...

Name: Jeremy Reines
Date: April 22, 2001

Hi Stephen: Loved your web. Great photos, I am sure you are going to love my site as well. I have just launched the MOST AMAZING virtual tour of Madrid at www.multimadrid.com and I would love for you to place my mini Java refresh live Plaza Mayor image on your website, if you place it on your links page I will include your URL in on my Madrid Webs dropdown menu, you can see more about htis program I have created at http://www.multimadrid.com/mm_info/madrid_webs.htm

Thanks for your time and I hope to hear from you soon,

Jeremy Reines...
www.multimadrid.com




Name: ylse sanchez
Date: April 19, 2001

Hi Steve,

Hace mucho que no se nada de ti, aunque no nos conocimos personalmente, se que eres un buen chico y espero estemos en contacto. Como sabes, estoy en Alemania con mi esposo y ahora espero un bb, estoy feliz. Recibe muchos carinos y escribeme pronto.

Tu amiga, Ylse


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How Many ColdFusion Titles Does Your Local Book Store Carry?

Over the weekend I passed by the Barnes & Nobles in Burlington, MA across from the mall, so I stopped to check out the latest titles in their vast Computers section, which spans about 8 bookshelves, each about 12-20 feet long and 5-10 rows high. This is an enormous amount of books for a generic book store just devoted to General Computing, Web Programming, Web Design, Graphic Design, Macintosh, Databases, XML, Perl, Java, C/C++, Windows, Unix/Linux, and more.

I poured over the titles looking for ColdFusion books, through the Java/J2EE section, past the ASP and PHP sections, on to the Web Programming section and even into the General Computing section, but there was no sign of the familiar blue and white covers, a popular color scheme in CFMX related books. Disappointed, and already thinking up a rant blog entry, I turned the corner and stumbled into the Web Design section. There among a towering but narrow shelf that was 10 or more rows high, saturated with Flash and Dreamweaver books, I finally recognized what I was looking for. Just below center were a tiny handful of ColdFusion books, including the CFMX Bible, the CFMX WACK set of books, the O'Reilly book, and a couple other titles I don't remember. Right next to it was a single Macromedia Flex book.

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Jeremy Allaire Interview on Meet The Makers still on Archive.org

On this eve of ColdFusion's 10th birthday, I'd like to point out Archive.org still hosts the well known interview with Jeremy Allaire, even though the article no longer lives on its original website.

You can check out Jeremy's inside view on the making of ColdFusion here:

A Conversation With Jeremy Allaire
"In this conversation, Allaire discusses the origins of ColdFusion and compares it to competing languages like Active Server Pages, PHP and Perl. We also discuss Allaires career, his fascination with wireless technology, the value of blogs and Allaires role in the history and the future of the Web."

Ryan Guill presents on COAL, the ColdFusion Open Application Library

EVENT:
Tomorrow, Wednesday July 13, Ryan Guill will present COAL, a new project for the ColdFusion Community.

TOPIC:
COAL, the ColdFusion Open Application Library was created to create a single repository for coldfusion components to be exposed as services and used in any ColdFusion application. The idea is similar to php's PEAR, althought there are several differences. The idea is to create a library of reusable services to keep developers from having to do the same tasks over and over, or having to reinvent the wheel everytime they need to create a new application. COAL puts these services in a position to be used very easily and makes them very flexible. COAL is built using the Java Service Locator pattern which makes for a very robust platform for delivery of the services.

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